Call Us for Free Case evaluation 360-435-1663

Can You Sue Your Car Insurance for Bad Faith?

Can You Sue Your Car Insurance for Bad Faith? It’s no secret that the relationship between an insurance company and its customers can often be a contentious one. After all, when you’re dealing with something as important as your car – and the potential for costly repairs or even a total loss – it’s natural to feel frustrated if you think your insurer is not treating you fairly. So, what happens when things go wrong, and it feels like your insurer is acting in bad faith? Can you sue them?

The answer to that question is not always simple and depends on a variety of factors. In general, though, if you can show that your insurance company has not acted in good faith towards you – for example, by refusing to pay a claim without a reasonable explanation or by trying to avoid paying out on a policy unfairly – then you may have grounds for a lawsuit.

Of course, suing your car insurance company is not always easy and can be expensive and time-consuming. But if you feel like you’ve been wronged, it may be worth exploring your options.

Read on to learn more about bad faith lawsuits against car insurance companies and how to decide whether or not it’s better to take legal action.

What Is Bad Faith Insurance?

Bad faith insurance is a legal term that describes situations where an insurance company does not act in good faith toward its policyholders. In other words, the company acts in a way that is unfair, deceptive, or otherwise not in line with the spirit of the insurance contract.

There are many ways an insurance company can act in bad faith. For example, an insurer might:

  • Refuse to pay a valid claim without a reasonable explanation: If you make a claim on your car insurance policy, the insurer should investigate and either approve or deny the claim within a reasonable timeframe. If the insurer refuses to pay without a good reason – such as if they say your claim is not covered by your policy when it actually is – this may be considered bad faith.
  • Delay payment of a claim: In some cases, an insurance company may drag its feet on approving or paying out a valid claim. This can be incredibly frustrating for policyholders, who may need the money to pay for repairs or the replacement of their car.
  • Lowball settlement offers: If you’re in an accident and make a claim on your insurance, the insurer may try to settle the claim for much less than it’s actually worth. This is sometimes known as “lowballing.”
  • Fail to investigate a claim: If you make a claim, the insurer should conduct a reasonable investigation to determine whether or not the claim is valid. If the insurer does not investigate or does not give you a fair opportunity to prove your claim, this may be considered bad faith.

These are just a few examples of bad faith insurance practices. If you think your insurer has acted in bad faith toward you, it’s important to speak with an experienced attorney who can help you understand your legal options.

What Are the Consequences of Bad Faith Insurance?

Bad faith insurance practices can have serious consequences for policyholders. If you’ve been the victim of bad faith insurance, you may be entitled to compensation for:

  • Your actual damages: This includes any losses you incurred as a direct result of the insurer’s bad faith actions, such as the cost of repairs to your car or the value of your car if it was totaled.
  • Your emotional distress: In some cases, the stress and anxiety caused by an insurer’s bad faith practices can be so severe that it leads to physical symptoms. If you can show that you’ve suffered from emotional distress as a result of the insurer’s actions, you may be entitled to additional damages.
  • Your attorney’s fees and court costs: If you have to sue your insurer to get the compensation you deserve, you may be able to recover the cost of your attorney’s fees and any other court costs.
  • Punitive damages: Due to the serious nature of bad faith insurance practices, some courts may award punitive damages to policyholders who have been wronged. Punitive damages are designed to punish the insurer for its actions and deter future bad faith practices.

What Should You Do If You Think Your Insurance Company Has Acted in Bad Faith?

If you think your insurance company has acted in bad faith, it’s important to speak with an experienced attorney as soon as possible. An attorney can review your case and help you understand your legal options.

In some cases, it may be possible to negotiate a settlement with the insurer without filing a lawsuit. However, if your insurer is unwilling to cooperate, you may need to take legal action to get the compensation you deserve.

What’s The Process for Filing a Bad Faith Insurance Claim?

The process for filing a bad faith insurance claim will vary depending on the state you live in and the specific facts of your case. In some states, policyholders must give the insurer notice of their intention to file a bad faith claim before they can take legal action.

Here’s the step-by-step process for filing a bad faith insurance claim in California:

  1. Notify your insurer of your intention to file a bad faith claim: In California, policyholders must give the insurer notice of their intention to file a bad faith claim before they can take legal action. This notice must be in writing and must be sent to the insurer’s corporate headquarters.
  2. File a complaint with the state’s insurance commissioner: Once you’ve given notice to your insurer, you can file a complaint with the California Department of Insurance.
  3. Hire an experienced attorney: It’s important to hire an experienced attorney who can help you navigate the bad faith insurance claim process.
  4. File a lawsuit: If your insurer does not cooperate, you may need to file a lawsuit to get the compensation you deserve.
  5. Go to trial: If your case goes to trial, a judge or jury will determine whether or not the insurer acted in bad faith and whether you are entitled to damages.

Each state has its own bad faith insurance laws, so it’s better to speak with an experienced attorney in your state for specific legal advice.

What Are the Statutes of Limitations for Bad Faith Insurance Claims?

The statute of limitations is the deadline for filing a lawsuit. If you miss the deadline, you’ll be barred from taking legal action. The statute of limitations for bad faith insurance claims will vary depending on the state you live in. In some states, the deadline is as short as one year from the date of the insurer’s bad faith actions. In other states, the deadline is two years or more.

It’s important to speak with an experienced attorney in your state as soon as possible to find out the specific deadlines that apply to your case.

Conclusion

If you believe that your insurance company has acted in bad faith, you may be able to file a lawsuit. However, it’s best to consult with a qualified attorney who can help you evaluate your case and advise you of the best course of action. If you have been the victim of bad faith insurance practices, don’t hesitate to contact a lawyer today.

Schedule a free consultation

The best way to get a free consultation for your wrongful death case is by contacting Wells|Trumbull. They have the experience and knowledge necessary in order to help you.

Other locations:
Seattle  | Snohomish County

Get Your Free Case Evaluation

The best way to get a free consultation for your severe personal injury case is by contacting Wells|Trumbull. They have the experience and knowledge necessary in order to help you.